Wednesday, September 23, 2009

New Dinosaur in Mesa (and it's not Barney)!

Ok, who loves dinosaurs?!? There is a new exhibit at the Arizona Museum of Natural History, coming October 3rd. It features a "lost dinosaur": Therizinosaur. I am trying to teach my two-year-old to say that.

While you are at the museum, check out dinosaur mountain, with monsoon storms every fifteen minutes. Since the outdoor temperature has cooled down from blistering to scorching, you might enjoy panning for gold in the courtyard!

For more information on the new exhibit, check out their website: http://www.azmnh.org , or see below.

Don't forget to take your receipts to the Mesa Arts Center to get a free admission at the museum: http://providentlivingmesa.blogspot.com/2009/07/shop-mesa-get-arts.html




One of the newest and strangest dinosaur fossils from North America is the subject of a stunning new major exhibit. "Therizinosaur-Mystery of the Sickle-Claw Dinosaur" opens Saturday, Oct. 3 at the Arizona Museum of Natural History, 53 N. Macdonald in Mesa.Paleontologists from the Museum of Northern Arizona in Flagstaff made an once-in-a-lifetime find in 2000 with discovery of a single toe bone during an excavation in southern Utah. The discovery led to the recovery of the most complete Therizinosaur skeleton ever found. While all dinosaurs lived on land, the Therizinosaur was found in a location that was the bottom of the Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway, an ancient sea that covered the middle of North America. But how did the whole animal, 93 million years ago, get buried in a seafloor, 60 miles from shore? Come to the Arizona Museum of Natural History to find the answer.The exhibit will include fossil beds and a life-size Therizinosaur that is a free-standing skeleton, cast from the original bones of the 13-foot tall, one-ton sickle-clawed and feathered dinosaur. It is the first mounted interpretation of the animal's stance and posture.The opening day of the exhibit will also feature a talk by Museum of Northern Arizona Paleontologist Dr. David Gillette, the exhibit curator, who led the excavation team that discovered the Therizinosaur remains. "The Curator's Story of Therizinosaur" will be held at 2 p.m. in the Arizona Museum of Natural History Theatre.For more information, contact Arizona Museum of Natural History Curator of Education Kathy Eastman at (480) 644-5662, or visit http://www.azmnh.org.

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